In my research and teaching I focus on how transformation of systems providing human needs such as energy or mobility, unfolds (or not) in various socio-economic and geographical conditions.

Anna Wieczorek, employee

In my research and teaching I focus on how transformation of systems providing human needs such as energy or mobility, unfolds (or not) in various socio-economic and geographical conditions

I am a scholar with expertise and interest in the transformation of systems providing human needs such as energy, mobility and built environment. Such a radical change of socio-technical systems is considered a precondition for reaching more sustainable development paths. I am in this field of system change for sustainability from 1999. Until 2011 I coordinated an international program on Industrial Transformation of the IHDP (International Human Dimensions Program). In my capacity as an executive officer of that initiative I contributed to the translation of the novel, though very western, insights about systemic change to other socio-economic and geographical conditions. Because of my interests in sustainability, my empirical work focused mainly on a region that, from a global sustainability perspective, matter most, namely the emerging Asia. In that context, I have published on aspects of experimentation, transnational linkages, sustainable development and Asian development pathways. In parallel, I have studied European renewable energy from the Technological Innovation System (TIS) perspective. My major input here is in the area of systemic innovation problems and instruments. As part of that research I contributed to the spatial and policy expansion of the TIS framework.  

My current interests focus on unpacking one of the most critical notions that is motivating systemic shifts, namely the process of upscaling of experiments. I study this process in the context of smart(mobility) and cycling experiments. I also search for the most effective ways to scale-up local community-driven energy initiatives. And, I continue my work on sustainability transitions in developing world. I am particularly fascinated by the differences in the socio-technical regimes in both contexts, and in the implications of the theoretical farming of these configurations for our understanding of the conditions, in which transitions unfold (or not). This need for better understanding of the transition processes is strongly driven by the desire to identify the most effective, context-sensitive strategies and policy instruments for sustainability.