ALD prize Erwin Kessels recognizes impact on Brainport industry

April 25, 2019

Physicist Erwin Kessels receives the ALD Innovator Award 2019, the most important award in the field of ALD and a recognition of the major impact that this technology has on industry, certainly in the Brainport region.

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Erwin Kessels, professor of Plasma Materials & Processing at TU/e, receives the ALD Innovator Award 2019 from the American Vacuum Society (AVS),  the most important award in the field of ALD, or Atomic Layer Deposition. Kessels is recognized for his contributions to the development of this technique in which ultra-thin layers of a material can be prepared atomic layer by atomic layer. His work has had great impact within the Brainport industry and has generated a great deal of activity in the region.

With Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), ultrathin layers a material can be applied in a highly controllable way and this method is currently essential in the fabrication of small structures as for example used in modern computer chips. According to the AVS, Kessels has made important contributions to the realization of ALD with plasma, and the use of the technology in photovoltaics and nanoelectronics. His work has for example contributed to the use of nanolayers prepared by ALD in many of the new solar cells produced. Kessels is currently focusing on the broad field of Atomic Scale Processing, the collection of techniques for making structures with atomic scale precision.

Major impact on industry

The prize will be presented this summer at the AVS International Conference on Atomic Layer Deposition in Bellevue/Seatlle in the state Washington (US). According to Kessels, the prize is a recognition of the major impact that this technology has on industry, certainly in the Brainport region. "The method of ALD is very popular with the industry within Brainport and in recent years many institutions and companies have started to do something with ALD because of our work," says Kessels.

Kessels studied and obtained a PhD at the TU/e. He has been working as a professor of Plasma Materials & Processing at the faculty of Applied Physics since 2011. He is also the scientific head of the NanoLab@TU/e clean room in Eindhoven and has more than 300 papers to his name.

Media contact

Barry van der Meer
(Science Information Officer)