Much interest for DSC/e’s Distinguished Lecture by Jim Keller

On October 5th, Jim Keller, one of the most prominent researchers in computational intelligence gave the third edition of the DSC/e Distinguished Lecture Series, where international thought leaders share their views on important data science topics. The lecture was titled “Recognition Technology: Lotfi’s look to the future from the late 1990s” and was organized in cooperation with the Netherlands Research School SIKS and the Benelux Chapter of the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society. It was attended by many data science enthusiasts, researchers and practitioners. The distinguished lecture was again a successful event, which illustrated the broad interest in data science in the Brainport region.

 

Professor Jim Keller is a Curators Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science departments at the University of Missouri, USA, as well as R. L. Tatum Professor for the college. He is a past editor-in-chief of IEEE Transactions on Fuzzy Systems, which has currently the highest impact factor amongst engineering journals. Professor Keller collaborates in a broad industrial network that includes the Electronics and Space Corporation, Union Electric, Geo-Centers, National Science Foundation, the Administration on Aging, The National Institutes of Health, NASA/JSC, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency, the Leonard Wood Institute, and the Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate.  He has (co-)authored over 450 technical publications, including the seminal textbook “Fundamentals of Computational Intelligence”. He is a true pioneer in computational intelligence and has received the prestigious 2007 Fuzzy Systems Pioneer Award and the 2010 Meritorious Service Award from the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society (CIS).  He has been a distinguished lecturer for the IEEE CIS and the ACM. All of these qualifications indicate the excellent qualities of our DSC/e Distinguished Lecture Series speaker.

In his talk, Jim Keller discussed how recognition technology forms the basis of today’s many data-driven applications. The recognition of conditions, patterns, objects, signals and context is a topic that many data scientists and practitioners are working on. By using two examples from two different domains, military image understanding and elderly healthcare, Jim Keller showed that there are common underlying principles to the application of recognition technology is such seemingly different domains. Hence, data science advances are built on top of such general principles.

 

In his talk, Jim Keller discussed how recognition technology forms the basis of today’s many data-driven applications. The recognition of conditions, patterns, objects, signals and context is a topic that many data scientists and practitioners are working on. By using two examples from two different domains, military image understanding and elderly healthcare, Jim Keller showed that there are common underlying principles to the application of recognition technology is such seemingly different domains. Hence, data science advances are built on top of such general principles.

Jim Keller also visited the Information Systems group of the Department of Industrial Engineering & Innovation Sciences. He engaged in discussions with different PhD students and researchers of the group. Professor Keller also gave a lecture on “how to publish in top scientific journals” to the PhD students of IEIS. After the DSC/e Distinguished Lecture there was the usual networking event, where attendants could discuss data science and other topics in an informal setting, enjoying finger food and drinks.