2010 Fall Research Retreat

Centre for Wireless Technology Eindhoven (CWTe)
CWTe 2010 Fall Research Retreat
October 26, 2010

Welcome and introduction 

Peter Baltus

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Videolink

CWTe: creating the (wireless) future ! 

Peter Baltus 

 

Key note: THz imaging and spectroscopy: the next wireless wave

Gianpiero Gerini
Marion Matters

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Key note: Better together in a new semiconductor era 

Hans Rijns

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Videolink

Enabling low power, multi-radio coexistence 

Erwin Janssen

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Videolink

Ultra-low power wireless design of autonomous sensor networks 

Peng Zhang

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Efficiency improvements in wireless networks for future European communication needs 

Rob Mestrom

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Videolink

Wireless Wire - ultra-low power and high-data-rate wireless system  

Xia Li

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Closing session 

Peter Baltus           

video stream will require QuickTime on your PC

CWTe: creating the (wireless) future!

Abstract:
Common wisdom holds that it is dangerous to predict the future beforehand, and in this case common wisdom might actually be right. It might be a lot easier to envision and create (or at least enable) a desirable future. In this presentation, such a desirable future will be presented from a wireless perspective, as well as the required research to enable such a future. The role of the Centre for Wireless Technology Eindhoven (CWTe), its research programs and way of working will be presented within this context.

Speaker’s bio:
Prof. Peter Baltus studied at the Technical University in Eindhoven, where he received his MSc degree in 1985 and his PhD degree in 2004. Peter worked for over 22 years at Philips and later NXP Semiconductors, where he focused on ADCs, mControllers, software, RF circuits & systems. He worked as a scientist, cluster leader, development lab manager, program manager, architect and fellow and was based in California, Eindhoven, Tokyo and Nijmegen. Since May 2007 Peter is full-time at the faculty of Electrical Engineering of the TU/e. He is professor in high frequency electronics in the MsM (Mixed Signal Microelectronics) group and he is director of the CWTe.

Key note: THz imaging and spectroscopy: the next wireless wave

Abstract:
The presentation, which also includes inputs from Dr. Lorenzo Tripodi (Philips), will give an overview about THz technology and applications in imaging and spectroscopy.

Integrated electronic THz systems will be introduced and compared to THz systems based on femto-second lasers.

THz electronics in CMOS technology will be illuminated in more detail on device and system level.
The field of mm-wave and THz antennas will be discussed on a number of examples.
In the last part of the presentation, an overview about the current market and the market expectations for THz technology will be given.

Speaker’s bio:
Giampiero Gerini received the M.Sc. degree (summa cum laude) and the Ph.D. degree in electronic engineering from the University of Ancona, Italy, in 1988 and 1992, respectively. From 1992 to 1994 he was Assistant Professor of Electromagnetic Fields at the same University. From 1994 to 1997, he was Research Fellow at the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA-ESTEC), Noordwijk, The Netherlands, where he joined the Radio Frequency System Division. Since 1997, he has been with the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), The Hague, The Netherlands. At TNO Defence Security and Safety, he is currently Chief Senior Scientist of the Antenna Unit in the Transceiver Department. In 2007, he has been appointed as part-time Professor in the Faculty of Electrical Engineering of the Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands, with a chair on Novel Structures and Concepts for Advanced Antennas.

He was co-recipient of the 2008 H. A. Wheeler Applications Prize Paper Award of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society. He was co-recipient also of the Best Innovative Paper Prize of the 30th ESA Antenna Workshop in 2008 and of the best antenna theory paper prize of the European Conference on Antennas and Propagation (EuCAP) in 2010.

His main research interests are phased arrays antennas, electromagnetic bandgap structures, frequency selective surfaces and integrated antennas at microwave, millimeter and sub-millimeter wave frequencies. The main application fields of interest are radar, imaging and telecommunication systems.

Marion K. Matters-Kammerer received the Bachelor (1997) and Master (1998) of physics and the Physikdiplom (1999) from Ecole Normale Superieure (Paris, France) and from TU Berlin (Germany). In 2006 she obtained the PhD degree in Physics from RWTH Aachen (Germany). In 1999 she joined Philips Research Aachen (Germany) and in 2004 Philips Research Eindhoven.

Since 2009 she is a lecturer and guest researcher at the faculty of electrical engineering at the RWTH Aachen (Germany).

Her research interests include System in Package and System on Chip integration of RF and microwave modules and ultrafast circuits for THz electronics. She has worked on RF design and technology development in LTCC, RF-laminate technologies, planar and 3D-micromachined integration in silicon as well as integration in CMOS technology in the RF and mm-wave frequency range.

Key note: Better together in a new semiconductor era

Abstract:
There is increasing awareness that sustainability requires sophisticated solutions in every domain of our lives. In many, if not all, cases sophisticated electronic functions will be required.

Whereas Moore’s law has enabled the digital society in the eighties and nineties, we are now entering an era whereby versatility of process and design technologies, in combination with a digital backbone is likely to change the landscape around us. In my company we call this the domain of High Performance Mixed Signal.

It appears to me that in the past, in our part of the world we have made significant contributions and have established a very well respected strength in this domain: both at academic level as well as in the industry.

Yet, there is no evidence of a structure in which we actively strengthen our combined expertise in this field, to the benefit of all participants, and to the longevity of the activity in this part of the world. My plea will be to change this.

Speaker’s bio:
René Penning de Vries is Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of NXP, the independent semiconductor company founded by Philips.

René is responsible for overseeing the product creation processes at NXP, focusing on the key areas of Innovation, Technology and Research. In this role, he is member of the NXP Management Team (MT), headed by Richard L. Clemmer.

René previously held the position of Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at Philips Semiconductors prior to the formation of NXP in 2006. He started working for Philips Research in 1984 before moving to Philips Semiconductors in 1987 and brings to his position at NXP a deep understanding of the design and technology needs of the semiconductor industry. His career evolved from various technical and managerial roles in CMOS development, into management of platform and design technology as well IP creation. Later, system technology and research have been added to his portfolio.

During his career, René worked and lived in the US, in Crolles, France and in Singapore, where he was Vice President of Technology in SSMC, a joint venture between Philips, TSMC and EDBi Singapore.  Rene has been intimately involved in the Crolles1 and Crolles2 projects.

René holds an MSc in physics from the University of Nijmegen and a PhD. in device physics from the Technical University of Twente, the Netherlands.

Key note: Open innovation for new wireless systems & applications

Abstract:
The global challenges we face in energy, personal security, mobility and personal healthcare will drive the demand for semiconductor solutions that interface and interact even stronger than today with the different analog physical domains of the outside world. Those interfaces will be implemented in mixed-signal technologies and determine more and more the value of the overall semiconductor function.
One class of these interface functions will clearly be wireless transceivers for data communication and user interfaces.

Our local industry and academia have a great opportunity to jointly address the overall design challenges for these new wireless technologies at system level. Our combined know-how spans the full competence range from process and assembly technologies, antenna, RF, baseband and MAC design and with combined efforts we can ensure an effective and efficient open-innovation approach to sustain our global position in this field.

Speaker’s bio:
Dr. Hans Rijns is Vice President and head of Research at NXP Semiconductors. He is responsible for all applications, systems, circuits and process technology research programs at NXP.
The Research technology programs are focused on Transceivers, Sensors & Actuators and Energy & Power management. Complementary to the technology programs, NXP Research is exploring new systems and applications in the field of Energy Efficiency, Connected Mobile devices, Security and Health – the macro growth drivers in semiconductor electronics.

He started his professional career in 1991 at Philips Research as scientist in the area of discrete-time mixed-signal circuits. In 1996 he moved to Philips Semiconductors and held various technical and business management positions mainly in the field of baseband and multimedia products for the wireless market. Since 2006, he proceeded to executive management positions in NXP Research.

Hans holds an M.Sc. and PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Twente, the Netherlands. He has over 30 scientific publications and holds 6 patents.

Enabling low power, multi-radio coexistence

Abstract:
Wireless communication is becoming pervasive. With the explosive growth in available wireless standards, next generation wireless transceivers are required to have multi-mode capabilities in order to meet cost, size and time-to-market demands.

Multi-mode transceivers suffer from co-existence problems that result in reduced performance when more than one transmitter and/or receiver are active at the same time. Especially when a receiver is trying to receive a weak signal and at the same time at least one other transmitter is active, this can result in high linearity requirements to prevent desensitization through blocking. The 1-dB compression point and intermodulation intercept points for multi-mode transceiver combinations that are expected to be needed in the foreseeable future can be as much as 20dB higher than in current single-mode radios. Obviously, increasing power dissipation of a transceiver IC - via classical scaling - by a factor of 100 is not acceptable. Therefore, another solution is required.

This project aims at a major reduction of power dissipation through such an optimization across the RF/baseband border line. In particular, RF circuits will be modified for reduced power at the cost of increased tolerances and distortions. Concurrently, these tolerances and distortions will be compensated for, partly in RF (through calibration and/or adaptation) and partly in baseband (through digital algorithms). Besides reduced power dissipation, such a joint design approach is expected to yield further benefits, such as smaller RF circuit size, and hence cost. Techniques developed in the project can also be applied to other low-power and high performance receivers.

Speaker’s bio:
Erwin Janssen was born in Deurne, the Netherlands, on July 20 1982. He received the bachelor degree from Fontys Hogescholen in 2004, and the master degree from Eindhoven University of Technology in 2008, both in electrical engineering.

Currently he is working towards the Ph.D. degree at Eindhoven University of Technology. His main research interests are concerned with the digital compensation of nonlinear distortion in RF receivers.

Ultra-low power wireless design of autonomous sensor networks

Abstract:
Recently, there has been much interest in the design of wireless sensor networks, which are now being applied in many industrial and civilian areas such as industrial process monitoring and control, healthcare, home automation, etc.  In most applications, wireless sensor networks work autonomously and are constrained by power consumptions.  Consequently, the design of power-efficient communications are highly required for sensor networks. In order to develop wireless low-power technologies, a collaboration project is being carried out by CTWe and Holst Centre for maximizing sensor networks life span. The project is divided into two parts. One part mainly focuses on the ultra low-power radio receiver design to push the limit of RF front-end’s power consumption while the other part concentrates on the signal processing for enhancing the reliability of wireless links. In this presentation, we will show the current achievement of the project. The designed low-power receiver and the investigated channel coding schemes will be presented.

Speaker’s bio:
Peng Zhang was born in Beijing, China, on December 18, 1981. He received B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees of Electrical Engineering from Huazhong University of Science &Technology, Wuhan, China in 2004 and University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands in 2007, respectively.  In 2007, he joined a two-year Post-Masters Stan Ackermans Institute program Information and Communication Technology at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e), Eindhoven, the Netherlands, and received his PDEng (Professional Doctorate of Engineering) degree in September 2009.  In October 2009, he started working on the PhD project on the topic of Robustness and Reliability in Wireless Body Area Networks in the Signal Processing System group at TU/e with the collaboration of Holst Centre. His research interest lies in signal processing for wireless communication systems.

Efficiency improvements in wireless networks for future European communication needs

Abstract:
Future communication needs in Europe require increased efficiency and energy savings in applications such as cellular handsets, base stations, and mobile satellite communications. This is covered in the European PANAMA project (Power Amplifiers aNd Antennas for Mobile Applications). The role of the CWTe in PANAMA will be covered in this presentation. First, a general overview will be given of the project goal, its social and economical relevance, and the involved partners and participants (both from industry and academia). Next, a more detailed description of the TU/e contribution will be given, based on ongoing work in three sub-projects.

Speaker’s bio:
Rob M.C. Mestrom (1981) received his MSc degree (cum laude) from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Eindhoven University of Technology in 2005. In 2009, he received the PhD degree from Eindhoven University of Technology. The topic of his PhD was first-principles-based multiphysics modeling and nonlinear dynamics in MEMS resonators. His research interests include modeling, nonlinear dynamics and control of (RF) MEMS.

After his PhD, he continued working on RF MEMS in the Electromagnetic and Wireless Group at the Department of Electrical Engineering in the same university. His research is within the European PANAMA project and deals on RF MEMS switches, filters and phase shifters and their application to base station transceivers.

Wireless Wire - ultra-low power and high-data-rate wireless interface

Abstract:
With rapid development of the wireless technology, low-power and short-range communications gain momentum and become increasingly important. When the market goes increasingly close to saturate and the technology becomes much more mature, a new demand on higher throughput pushes the wireless communication going further to the high-data-rate direction.

Along with the progress, however, both the wireless protocols and the physical systems and devices start to become complicated. Due to the technology limit, the power consumption of the devices, especially of the RF front-ends increase significantly. The power problem causes a dilemma that these high-data-rate wireless interfaces are hard to be integrated in the portable devices which are normally battery-powered.

Based on the challenge encountered, we propose the novel wireless wire communication solution. Instead of using the conventional communication method, a 60 GHz beamsteering directional communication is chosen, which confines the RF power within a narrow beam and increase the antenna EIRP gain by a factor of N2 in both transmitter and receiver (N is the antenna number). Since extra gain is obtained from the antenna beamsteering, less front-end gain is required, which in turn reduces the power consumption of the front-end. Besides, an ultra-low power duty-cycled wake-up receiver is added to listen to the channel, which is based on the injection locking approach. The main radio is switched on by the wake-up receiver only when a task is detected. Our entire system consumes less than 30 μW average power consumption with 1-Gbps data rate and 5-meter communication range in the normal WPAN scenario. This power level fits the battery-based wireless applications quite well. The physical system is implemented in standard TSMC 65-nm technology without any off-chip device, and thus it is low-cost for mass production.

Speaker’s bio:
Xia Li was born in China in 1983. She received the B.S. degree in electronics and information engineering from Harbin Institute of Technology in China and M.S. degree in microelectronics in Delft University of Technology in Netherlands. She is currently working towards the Ph.D degree in Eindhoven University of Technology in Netherlands.

Her research interests include millimeter wave RF IC design, low-power wireless systems and ICs design, device modeling and passive devices design, and cross-layer design and optimization.