2011 Research Retreat

Centre for Wireless Technology Eindhoven (CWTe)
CWTe 2011 Research Retreat
October 18, 2011

Welcome and introduction

Peter Baltus

Just Imagine....CWTe

Peter Baltus

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Key note: Innovation Innovation

Ronald Wolf

Key note: Radios living on air

Harmke de Groot

When to wake up? Low power Wake-Up Receiver Design

Maarten Lont

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Fetal monitoring on the move, from a hospital to in-home setting

Michiel Rooijakkers

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System Study of a 60 GHz Wireless-Powered Monolithic Sensor System

Wu Yan

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Antenna innovations for wireless communication

Bart Smolders

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Closing session

Peter Baltus

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Just Imagine....CWTe

Abstract:
Peter Baltus will talk about the latest developments in wireless technology and show that there are still many challenges that need resolution so that a sustainable growth in wireless is achievable. He will discuss the role of CWTe herein today and in the future.

Speaker’s bio:
Prof. Peter Baltus studied at the Technical University in Eindhoven, where he received his MSc degree in 1985 and his PhD degree in 2004. Peter worked for over 22 years at Philips and later NXP Semiconductors, where he focused on ADCs, mControllers, software, RF circuits & systems. He worked as a scientist, cluster leader, development lab manager, program manager, architect and fellow and was based in California, Eindhoven, Tokyo and Nijmegen. Since May 2007 Peter is full-time at the faculty of Electrical Engineering of the TU/e. He is professor in high frequency electronics in the MsM (Mixed Signal Microelectronics) group and he is director of the CWTe.

Key note: Innovation Innovation

Abstract:
In the past decades corporate innovation has developed from a vertically organised innovation methodology into an innovation landscape with many players involved. This talk will give an overview of important trends that have shaped the way companies innovate. Especially the development of long term seeds of essentially new business and the role that interaction between vertically organised R&D organisations with others in the innovation domain can have will be addressed.

Speaker’s bio:
Ronald Wolf (1961) is Director Venturing of the Philips Research. He is responsible for the Philips Research venture development and for technology research activities built up interacting with external R&D.
After receiving his PhD in Chemistry and Physics he joined Royal Philips Electronics in 1990 as a research scientist focusing on advanced materials based device research. In 1995 he moved to the Philips Research Labs in Briarcliff, US, initiating miniaturisation efforts in the field of magnetic power devices. In 1999 he became Director of Research of subsequent research groups in the areas of materials science, solid state devices and fluidic devices. In 2008 he established venturing as a means to innovate in the Philips Research organisation.
In his current role he particularly focuses on increasing the Philips innovation potential especially by increasing the interaction with external R&D innovation sources.

Key note: Radios living on air

Abstract:
Internet of things implies that any device will have capability to communicate with its surrounding. But some devices are so small that battery replacement during their lifetime is not practicable or even impossible. These devices have to be self-powered and/or running on a tiny battery for its complete lifetime in some cases more than 10 years.
This presentation will look at some examples of such small devices and then discuss what new requirements rise on network architecture and radios.

Speaker’s bio:
Harmke de Groot is program director Ultra Low Power Wireless and DSP at Holst Centre/imec in the Netherlands. The team’s focus is on radio and DSP solutions in the microW to mW range enabling smart sensor networks and other ultra low power applications. Until May 2008 she was group program manager at the European Microsoft Innovation Center (EMIC) in Aachen, Germany, an applied research center collaborating with many industrial and academic partners. Since 1996, she held several positions in R&D at Philips and NXP in the area of communication systems and other networked embedded devices, amongst others she contributed to the development and standardization of the first Bluetooth solutions. De Groot is (co-)author of more than 50 publications and a book on embedded system design, holds 3 patents and is member of several expert groups. She holds a degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Technology Eindhoven.

When to wake up? Low power Wake-Up Receiver Design

Abstract:
There is a growing interest in Body Area Networks (BAN) for medical applications. It enables people to be monitored over long periods without the need of being hospitalized. However, there are still some challenges to be conquered. One of the main challenges is the power consumption of such wireless nodes, since it is unpractical and sometimes impossible to replace the batteries on regular basis.
To conserve energy, nodes are in sleep mode as long as possible. This leads to the question: “When to wake up?” Preferably the node should only wake up when the network master wants it to transmit its data. The node has to listen at intervals whether or not a wake-up call is transmitted. To maximally conserve energy the node needs to sleep for very long periods. However, this means that the latency increases which limits the maximal power reduction and the only viable solution is to design a very low power Wake-Up Receiver (WURx).
The main goal of this research is to decrease the power consumption of wake-up. A factor of 10 to 100 is needed compared with other commercially available radios. The reduction in power consumption can only be achieved when other requirements are diminished. In this presentation we will focus on which requirements can be relaxed and how we can use this to decrease the power consumption.

Speaker’s bio:
Maarten Lont was born in Steinheim, Germany in 1983. He received the B.Sc. (August 2005) and M.Sc. (May 2008) degrees in electrical engineering at Eindhoven University of Technology. Currently, he is pursuing the Ph.D. degree at the same university in close cooperation with the Holst Centre on the design of ultra-low-power wakeup receivers.

Fetal monitoring on the move, from a hospital to in-home setting

Abstract:
Because of the progressively higher age at which women get pregnant, high-risk pregnancies are becoming more and more prevalent. As a result an increase of the number hospitalizations due to medical disorders such as diabetes, hypertensive disorders, or diagnosis of fetal distress, can be observed. Regular monitoring of pregnancy progression has been proven to reduce complications and mortality. With currently used systems however, it would generate extremely high costs and require pregnant women to frequent the hospital on a regular basis. Therefore the replacement of currently used fetal monitoring systems by home-based portable monitoring is necessary to allow for affordable continuous monitoring of pregnancy progression and fetal health.
In this presentation a novel low power fetal monitoring system is proposed, which is suitable for home use throughout pregnancy. Different from currently available fetal monitoring systems, our system processes the raw measurement data with a local DSP, only communicating extracted physiological parameters. This way the total power consumption of the system can be reduced by multiple orders of magnitude, allowing for operation of the system throughout the last months of pregnancy using a single 230mAh Lithium cell as a power source.

Speaker’s bio:
Michiel Rooijakkers was born at the end of 1982 in 's Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands. He obtained the M.Sc. degree here at the University of Technology Eindhoven (TU/e), in 2010. From April until August 2008 he did an internship at the Maxima Medical Center in Veldhoven, to research the use of wavelet transforms in fetal heart rate variability analysis. In May 2009 he started an internship at Philips Research in Eindhoven, where he did research on ultra low power R-peak detection, allowing for a trade of between detection quality and power consumption. Since September 2010 he is a Ph.D.-student with the TU/e. His research involves the development of a low power wearable system to determine the health of a fetus and the progression of pregnancy using sensors placed on the maternal abdomen.

System Study of a 60 GHz Wireless-Powered Monolithic Sensor System

Abstract:
Future State-of-the-art batteryless wireless sensors have separate modules for sensing and energy scavenging. Such separation increases the size and cost of sensors and limits their robustness. To overcome these limitations, we propose a 60 GHz wireless sensor system, which we call the PREMISS system, based on monolithic sensors with on chip sensing, tranceiving, integrated antenna and energy scavenging. In the PREMISS system, a high-power central controller transmits RF energy and information to many low-power low-cost sensors via pencil beams and receives and detects the information from these sensors. In this presentation, we present a system study on the PREMISS system highlighting design challenges and practical implementation considerations. From the link budget calculation, we show that in the PREMISS system, a signal to noise ratio of 17 dB at the central controller receiver may be achieved from a sensor 5 meters away. In addition, we also identified that one key challenge in the PREMISS system is the design of good efficiency rectifiers for input power and voltage levels far below those in state-of-the-art 2.4 GHz systems.

Speaker’s bio:
Dr. Yan Wu obtained the bachelor of engineering degree with first-class honours in Electrical Engineering from National University of Singapore (NUS) in 1999 and in 2001, he obtained Master of Engineering degree in the same university. He worked in Institute for Infocomm Research (I2R) in Singapore from 2001 till 2008 on various communication systems, including ADSL/ VDSL, IEEE 802.11a, IEEE 802.11n etc . In 2008 he joined the Signal Processing Systems (SPS) group in Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) as a PhD candidate and he obtained his PhD degree in 2009. Since then, he has been working in the SPS group as a postdoc researcher. His research area lies in signal processing for communications, low-power communication and sensing systems design, and signal processing for intelligent lighting systems.

Antenna innovations for wireless communication

Abstract:
In this presentation an overview will be given on the advances in antenna technology in the different research projects within CWTe. The talk will cover steerable beam phased-array antennas, antenna efficiency and matching as well as new antenna-on-chip techniques.

Speaker’s bio:
Bart Smolders is professor in the Electromagnetics group of the faculty of Electrical Engineering of the TU Eindhoven on the subject antennas since early 2009. Prof. Smolders joined the university after various industry positions with Thales, Astron and NXP. At NXP he was Innovation Manager for 9 years. He received his PhD and Master-of-Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the TU Eindhoven.
Next to his role in the Electromagnetics group, Prof. Smolders is Director of Education within the faculty of Electrical Engineering.