Assistant Professor

Gerrit Rooks

Dominance hierarchies are an evolutionary burden that hinder well-being of humans in general and equality among genders in particular.

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Research Profile

Gerrit Rooks is an Assistant Professor of Human Technology Interaction at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e). He is interested in how humans are embedded in a social context, which consists of network of relations and institutions, and how this social embeddedness affects their innovative and general performance. At present, Gerrit plans to continue his work on entrepreneurial networking, how networking technology can help elderly, and gender differences in network perception. Research findings, which have been applied in networking trainings and a network tool, include the following: - There is an optimal amount of network embeddedness for entrepreneurs. When an entrepreneur is embedded in a close-knitted network, she may lose touch with the wider global network and miss innovative opportunities. When an entrepreneur is embedded in very open, sparse network, she may lose the benefits of the collaborative advantages that a close-knitted network offers. - Men and women perceive their network in different ways, which may offer an explanation for the “network paradox” that women are better at social and network cognition, but somehow their networks are less resourceful. Gerrit’s research shows that the socio-cognitive advantages that women have over men, are nullified in dominance hierarchies (which are omnipresent in our organizations)

Academic Background

Gerrit Rooks obtained an MSc at Groningen University in Social Psychology & Statistics and Measurement Theory. His MSc thesis was entitled “A poisson regression model of the effect of absenteeism culture on individual absenteeism”. He obtained a PhD in Sociology at Utrecht University with a thesis entitled “Strategic Management of Purchasing Transactions”. He is working at a visiting professor at Makerere University Business School in Uganda since 2006, providing workshops to local staff twice a year, and supervising PhD students.  

Educational Activities

  • Behavioral research methods 1: Designing research
  • Behavorial and social theories of HTI (homologation course)
  • Behavioral and social theories of human technology interaction
  • Network Society
  • Risk, trust and social media
  • HTI in social context

Ancillary Activities

No ancillary activities