Two TU/e students won best thesis award at the World Class Maintenance (WCM) competition 2017

Corné Suijkerbuijk was awared the first price with his MSc thesis “Integration of preventive maintenance and inventory management for healthcare systems”. In the BSc category, Nina Rooijakkers won with her thesis: “Impact of on-location, temporary fix additive manufacturing of spare parts on service supply chains at the Royal Netherlands Army”

 

Corné Suijkerbuijk

IAM master’s student Corné Suijkerbuijk, won the first prize in the annual World Class Maintenance (WCM) competition for his master thesis on the topic of “Integration of preventive maintenance and inventory management for healthcare systems” at Philips Healthcare. Corné investigated a highly challenging topic and worked towards the realization of an industrial solution, while opening new theoretical paths for future investigation. His thesis deals with the development of approaches for the calculation of the remaining useful lifetime of critical components of healthcare machines and for their cost-optimal preventive maintenance schedule, while also investigating the effect of the schedule change (from corrective & scheduled to preventive maintenance) on the supply chain level.

Corné wrote his MSc thesis under the joint supervision of Dr. Stella Kapodistria and Dr. Marko Boon, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e), and of Dr. Dimitrios Mavroeidis, Senior Research Scientist at Philips. The thesis was written in the context of the TU/e-Philips flagship on the research program of Smart Maintenance and within the DSC/e Research Program Smart Manufacturing & Maintenance.

Nina Rooijakkers 

Industrial Engineering student Nina Rooijakkers received first prize at this year’s World Class Maintenance competition for her bachelor thesis titled “Impact of on-location, temporary fix additive manufacturing of spare parts on service supply chains at the Royal Netherlands Army”. The competition jury much appreciated Nina’s thesis, mentioning that her work felt more like a master thesis than a bachelor thesis. The jury also appreciated the novelty in topic, as additive manufacturing (3D printing), has great potential to change service supply chains, but has so far received limited scientific attention. Nina’s research helps the Royal Netherlands Army understand the impact of 3D printing on their supply chains. In addition to this practical value, her research also yielded valuable case studies to validate scientific research conducted by TU/e researchers.

Nina’s BSc project was supervised by Bram Westerweel MSc and Dr. Rob Basten from the School of Industrial Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, and by Captain Jelmar den Boer and Captain Stephan Wildenberg, Royal Netherlands Army. Nina’s research is part of the NWO-funded SINTAS project, which investigates the impact of new technologies on after-sales service supply chains.