J.J.F. (Jelle) Sleeboom MSc - Expertise

Sleeboom, J.J.F.  MSc
Address :
Technische Universiteit Eindhoven
P.O. Box 513
5600 MB EINDHOVEN
Department :
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Section :
Soft Tissue Biomechanics & Tissue Engineering
Positioncategory :
doctoral candidate (PhD) (PhD Stud.)
Position :
doctoral candidate
Room :
GEM-Z 3.122
Tel :
+31 40-247 2186
Tel (internal) :
2186
Email :
J.J.F.Sleeboom@tue.nl
Department :
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Section :
Microsystems
Positioncategory :
doctoral candidate (PhD) (PhD Stud.)
Position :
doctoral candidate
Room :
GEM-Z 3.122
Tel :
+31 40-247 2186
Tel (internal) :
2186
Email :
J.J.F.Sleeboom@tue.nl

Expertise

Biography

Jelle Sleeboom, born in Utrecht in 1989, obtained his BSc in Mechanical Engineering at Eindhoven University of Technology in 2012. During his final bachelor project, under supervision of dr. Hans Wyss, he contributed to microfluidic single particle trapping and squeezing technology. His sparked interest in microfluidic technology drove him to join prof.dr.ir. Jaap den Toonder's Microsystems group as an MSc student in 2013. During his time in the group, he spent several months abroad at Harvard's Wyss Institute in Boston, USA, where he worked on a microfluidic model of the Blood Brain Barrier. It was here that he first experienced the power of combining microsystems and biological research. He continued exploring the interdisciplinary field of "organ-on-chip" technology during his graduation project, where he worked on obtaining control over single cells in a human brain model, using microfluidic encapsulation technology. After graduating within the brain-on-a-chip project of dr. Regina Luttge, he started his PhD in the Soft Tissue Biomechanics & Engineering (STBE) group of prof.dr. Carlijn Bouten in 2016. His current research focuses on developing "breast-cancer-on-a-chip" technolgy to study the mechanisms that underlie cancer metastasis, based on collaboration between dr.Cecilia Sahlgren from the STBE group and prof.dr.ir. Jaap den Toonder. His current research interests are: Microfabrication & fluidics, organ-on-chip technology, mechanobiology, the Notch pathway, and cancer-on-chip technology.