Using someone else's work

When may I use (publish or multiply) work by others without requiring permission from those others?
For a scientific researcher or teacher the cases listed below in which you may (partly) use work by others without requiring permission, are relevant:
1. You may make a digital or paper copy of a work (mulitplication) if it is meant for personal use or study.
2. You may cite brief passages from works by others (publicize) in your own work. The citation must however be relevant, and source and name of author must be mentioned.
3. You may use parts from a work for clarification in teaching. Here too clear quotation of source is obligatory. A fee for using another's text must be paid (reader fee).
4. 'Bare' legal text and other government information is free from copyright. You may therefore use these in your work without permission.

Where do I find information on reader regulations?
For information on use of (parts of a) work for your lectures (reader regulations), see TU/e web page on reader rights.

May I make hyperlinks to copyright-protected work in my website or in a digital learning environment for my subject?
Yes, hyperlinking is permitted.

May I scan a printed article by someone else and store it on my computer?
Yes, you may scan an article by someone else and store it on your computer if it is for personal study.

May I scan a printed article by someone else and send it to a colleague via e-mail?
No. You may scan an article by someone else and store it on your computer as described above, but you may not pass it on to a colleague via e-mail.





Latest update: 1 January 2009