Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control

Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) allows for short-distance automatic vehicle following using inter vehicle wireless communication, thereby potentially improving road throughput. As designing a CACC platoon, the string stability is one of the main goals to reduce perturbations downstream.

PhD Candidate: Haitao Xing MSc
Supervisor: prof. dr. Henk Nijmeijer
Project Funding: Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC)
Project Period: September 2013 - August 2017

Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC), which is regarded as an extension of the Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC), allows for short-distance automatic vehicle following using inter vehicle wireless communication, thereby potentially improving road throughput.

String stability is one of the main goals, when it comes to designing a CACC platoon. It can be defined as the system’s ability to reduce perturbations downstream, avoiding that leading vehicle speed changes cause amplification in the rest system.

The time headway is introduced for the string stability, as it may be detrimental to road throughput and capacity. Therefore, it is important though challenging to find the smallest time headway to guarantee string stability, while maximizing the road capacity, especially in the face of traffic and network dynamics. The smallest time headway requires insight into the string stability margins in the presence of uncertainties or unknown disturbances in future work.

Considering the application of CACC in highway and urban traffics, the current focuses are as follows: (1) String stability approach maximizing the throughput; (2)Network communication with the time delay and disturbance; (3)Cut-in & Cut-out in short period of time; (4)Heterogeneous time headway will be discussed.